Tag: IOUG

The cost of data breaches and data proliferation continues to grow year after year. As DBAs, it is our job to protect the data. A great place to learn more about data security and network with other DBAs is at COLLABORATE 2019, which has 18 sessions featuring database security topics. You can learn to use the features, functionality, and applications available from Oracle to reduce the possibility of unauthorized access to data by hackers or internal users.

This article provides a firm foundation of why you need to secure your database, as well as tips on how to get started. Think of this as a prelude to my COLLABORATE session, “Why Your Database is Not Secure,” which will help you learn how to leverage security information you gather to propose and implement changes to increase the security of your data.

This article, part three of a three-part series, explores a DBAs journey to APEX.

The frenetic pace of application development in modern IT organizations means it’s not unusual to demand an application be built with minimal requirements gathering – literally, from a napkin-based sketch – to a working first draft of the app within extremely short time frames – even a weekend! – with production deployment to follow just a few days later. This article – the third in this ongoing series – demonstrates how simple it is to improve a basic prototype of the existing APEX application as well as construct a simple yet functional application for volunteer canvassers to connect with registered voters in a huge northwest suburban Chicago voting district, right from their mobile devices. Missed Part 2? Catch up here first.

Recent years have shown an upshift of open source technologies with an evident increase in hybrid applications from licensed and proprietary tools. One such popular technology is Python programming language, which has made its way to the top. Most of its popularity can be attributed to the variety of options it provides for visualization and machine learning alongside the application development and automation. This article will primarily focus on how Python’s graphing libraries can be used to understand data from a database administrator’s (DBA’s) perspective.

Hear from the SELECT editors about what they're looking forward to this year at COLLABORATE 19.
Each year, thousands of Oracle technology users gather at COLLABORATE to exchange knowledge and learn from some of the industry’s best minds. Held April 7-11 this year in San Antonio, Texas, COLLABORATE 19 offers more than 1,000 sessions and panels to choose from, focusing on first-hand experiences, case studies, and practical how-to content. If you’re looking to sharpen your skills and make meaningful peer-to-peer connections, COLLABORATE 19 is the place to be.

Last month I wrote about lists and the thought process in choosing between a bulleted list versus a numbered list. Recall that I suggested using bulleted lists for collections of items, and numbered lists for sequences of steps. While that’s good advice, some cases can be spun in either direction. Sometimes the decision between a collection of items and process has more to do with your specific approach to a topic than to the nature of the list items.

The frenetic pace of application development in modern IT organizations means it’s not unusual to demand an application be built with minimal requirements gathering – literally, from a napkin-based sketch – to a working first draft of the app within extremely short time frames – even a weekend! – with production deployment to follow just a few days later. This article – the second in this ongoing series – focuses on how easy it is to leverage Oracle APEX to build the first of several components of a sufficiently-robust application for election canvassers to identify, classify, and inform voters in a huge northwest suburban Chicago voting district.

With growing demands from businesses for real-time, analytical capabilities, maintaining data environments that can grow with these demands is a necessity. This is pressuring data administrators to deliver responsive, high-performing systems that can scale with the business. However, many enterprises are encumbered by the licensing and support issues that typically accompany database systems, resulting in…

With growing demands from businesses for real-time,analytical capabilities, maintaining data environments that cangrow with these demands is a necessity. This is pressuring dataadministrators to deliver responsive, high-performing systemsthat can scale with the business. However, many enterprises areencumbered by the licensing and support issues that typicallyaccompany database systems, resulting in potentially high andunexpected costs, as well…

Hear from the SELECT Editors about what's on the top of their DBA wishlist for 2019.

This article explains how to configure Oracle API Gateway as a cluster on Solaris SPARC. The software can be download from the Oracle Technology Network. Before installing the API Gateway, you need to consider which components you require. Some components — for example, API Gateway Analytics — have additional requirements, such as a database. There are different components that could be installed, too, such as Policy Studio. There is not much documentation that discusses how to configure the Cluster for this product, so I chose to write one and be the first. The version of the API Gateway used in this article is Release 11.1.2.4.0, which is the latest at the time of writing.